Letter To Myself (as a Teenager)


Dear teenage me,

Please take some time to hang out with your friends and do teenage activities as soon as possible. 

Responsibility is a good trait to have. It will serve you well for a long time, but you deserve this time to be a teenager-not an adult biding time until graduation.

Stand up for what you believe in. It takes you a long time to start doing this. When you do, you find out that a lot of people “knew” you would make a difference because of your strong opinions and never-back-down attitude.

The day you sat by appalled as another teenager’s Bible was destroyed and they were mocked in front of an entire classroom, yeah, you will wish for the rest of your life that you had stood up that day. Your own children will make those kind of stands on a daily basis in both middle and high school. Start now, yourself.


Be yourself. Whether you know who that is or not.


Explore topics and subjects that interest you. Even if it means walking into a room, a school, or a place of employment full of people you are sure will hate you. Especially then, actually.

Hold your head high and stride with a purpose. People will notice and be drawn to your self-confidence. 

Ask for help. People like to be needed. It doesn’t show your weaknesses; it sets you up to be a leader. 

Learn to set boundaries and say no. This will become one of your biggest downfalls as an adult. Saying yes to every good opportunity that comes your way means that you can’t give any opportunity the best of you. 

Seek out those who need a friend and be their friend. Stop waiting for someone to want to be your best friend. A day will come when you will desperately want someone to shop with, get coffee with, and just sit around and talk to. Invest deeply in those friendships now, so you’ll have deep friendships later.

Stop wondering why you don’t have a boyfriend. You don’t because it’s not time yet. God has a great plan, and you don’t want to ruin it by chasing down bad ones!

You are not a victim. You are a survivor, an overcomer, a girl who will walk through many a fire and come out stronger, more refined every single time. 

The very harshest parts of you become the biggest heart of you. And you will see the way you protect others, the way you love others, the way you encourage others, the way you are motivated to inspire positive change in others springs out of the darkest parts of your memory. You don’t have to enjoy those times, but know that through your experiences others will be blessed and find encouragement.

Perhaps, if you’ve taken nothing else from this, I can assuage your fear of an extremely early death. You will not die before you’re thirty or twenty-five or whatever your current number is. You will live that long plus some. 




Take time to enjoy it.

Inspiration for this post was taken from 30 Days of Your Stories . Please hop over to her blog and check out her awesome idea!!!

You can link to MY 30 days of stories below!

1. Saturday mornings
2. Neighbors
3. Vacation
4. Music
5. Accents
6. Cars
7. Books
8. Purse
9. Your favorite grade
10. Your Go-To Story
11. Holidays
12. Letter to yourself as a teenager
13. Lying
14. Pets
15. Sports
16. Your Room
17. One time you weren’t cool
18. Weather
19. Recipe
20. What you want to remember
21. Traveling
22. Shoes
23. Favorite Bible verse
24. Your bravest moment
25. Garden
26. Your favorite color
27. The breathings of your heart
28. Comfort
29. The book inside you
30. Your worst fear

12 comments

  • Carrie,
    I did enjoy the frankness and also the humor. It gives me a good idea of what you were like then and now, and also shows that you know your strong and weak points. Interesting!
    Amy

  • Some great words of advice to your teenager self. If only we all had that! 🙂 <3

  • This was inspirational. I tried to envision what I’d say to my teenage self.

  • some great advice for teenagers.

  • I am a teenager still. . . thanks for the advice. 🙂

  • When I was a teenager, we had a teacher that had us all write letters to our older selves. He held on to those letters and mailed them to us 10 years later. It was a great way to ‘check in’ with yourself to see how you were doing.

  • What great advice you wrote to your teenage self. I wonder if you would have listened? Their main thought is that they know everything. They have to learn by experience. But, I enjoyed reading your advice.

  • Man, when I was a teenager, I was so unhappy and jealous of everyone around me. I wish I had that someone in my life early on to help me out of these stuck moments like the ones you’re describing.

  • Hi Carrie,

    What a great post! Thanks for sharing your advice to your teenage self 🙂 Creative…awesome share!!

  • #ultrablog Hi Carrie,
    You are the FEATURED blog link?! A celeb for sure! Anyway, as I wrote you yesterday, Your post made me reflect. I went through a period when I was too “cocky” for lack of a better word. I was an adult but in hindsight probably had the immaturity of a teenager. I regret that attitude. I’d write my 30 year-old self a letter saying, “Janice, get down from your high horse!”

  • WOW — what great advise and wisdom! I think this would be a great letter to young ladies in your life for a birthday (customized, of course). I’m reading Lysa Teurkerst’s book The Best Yes — your post reminded me of it — making those choices, setting those boundaries and making room for God to direct your paths! Great post!

  • Great letter, I rushed my teenage years in a hurry to be an adult and wish I had more carefree years now. Thank you for signing up for My Motivational Monday linkup I hope you’ll stop by again this Monday.